Man vs. Row

by Brent Baxter

Songwriters, Take Your Listeners To The Movies

Man vs Row

Brent is a hit songwriter with cuts by Alan Jackson, Randy Travis, Lady Antebellum, Joe Nichols, Gord Bamford, Ray Stevens, and more.  He’s written a top 5 hit in the US and a #1 in Canada… so far.

Imagine yourself in a darkened movie theater. The movie starts to play, but there is just sound… no picture. You’d be upset, right? Well, then, why do we sometimes write songs that way?

I think the movie analogy is an appropriate one for songwriting.

After all, don’t we basically write 3-minute movies?

Our job is to entertain, to move, or to make the listener think. Just like a movie. But because songs are an audio format, we sometimes forget about the pictures. But they are terribly important!

Take, for instance, “The Thunder Rolls” written by Garth Brooks and Pat Alger. Yes, it’s an oldie, but it’s a classic. This lyric is a movie all by itself. Let’s look at the first verse:

3:30 in the morning / not a soul in sight / the city’s looking like a ghost town / on a moonless summer night / raindrops on the windshield / there’s a storm moving in / he’s heading back from somewhere / that he never should have been / and the thunder rolls

You can SEE that verse. The ghost town, the dark night, the raindrops. Not only that, but you can HEAR it. The thunder rolls. While this lesson will focus on visuals, don’t forget that you have FIVE senses, and you should use as many of them in a song as possible. Let’s look at the second verse:

Every light is burning / in a house across town / she’s pacing by the telephone / in her faded flannel gown / askin’ for a miracle / hopin’ she’s not right / praying it’s the weather / that’s kept him out all night / and the thunder rolls

Again, you can SEE and HEAR that verse. Lights burning, pacing by the phone, the faded flannel gown, the thunder rolls. And the third verse is just as visual as the first two.

It is no accident that some writers refer to sensory details as “furniture.” An empty room is not very inviting. It doesn’t hold your attention very long. However, a room with a great big couch and great art on the walls INVITES you in for a while. It gives you something to look at.

I got this feedback from an old publisher when I didn’t have strong visuals in a song. He said it left him, as he called it, “floating around in space with nothing to hang on to. You’re just telling me how you FEEL.”

There’s a songwriting adage that says, “Don’t TELL me, SHOW me.” Visuals give you something to latch on to. A strong visual or other sensory image at the front end of a song really draws a listener in. It gives you a picture right off the bat.

Take these following first lines from some recent hit songs:

Doublewide Quick Stop midnight T-top Jack in her Cherry Coke town – “American Kids” sung by Kenny Chesney

Quarter in the payphone, clothes drying on the line – “Automatic” sung by Miranda Lambert

Those high heels with that sun dress, turquoise heart hanging ‘round your neck – “My Eyes” sung by Blake Shelton

Summer comin’ through a rolled down window, tearin’ down an almost two lane back road – “We Are Tonight” sung by Billy Currington

And now a few hits that are a couple years back…

Sun shines, clouds rain, train whistles blow and guitars play – “It Just Comes Natural” sung by George Strait

I’ve packed a cooler and a change of clothes – “Want To” by Sugarland

Driving through town, just my boy and me. With a happy meal on his booster seat- “Watching You” by Rodney Atkins

I can take the rain on the roof of this empty house- “What Hurts The Most” Rascal Flatts

She’s a yellow pair of running shoes, a holey pair of jeans- “She’s Everything” Brad Paisley

I could do this for days. Now, I know there are examples out there of purely emotional songs that do well. But if you look at the songs that are not written by the artist or by the producer or by an established hit songwriter, I think you’ll see a trend.

So good luck with your songwriting. Use lots of visuals, and keep at it.

What about you?  Do you tend to write with or without a lot of imagery?  Are there lines from some other songs you think have great imagery that you’d like to share?  I’d love to hear from you!

God Bless,

Brent

ARE YOU READY TO JOIN MvR IN THE TOP 10 THIS WEEK?

The listener’s reaction to your song is only as real as the character in your song. The W.I.L.L.power workshop will teach you tips & techniques to make the characters in your songs come alive and jump out of the radio and into your listeners’ hearts. There are only a handful of tickets available for this intimate get-together, AND THE WORKSHOP IS THIS WEEK! Click on the image below to find out more!

MvR Top 10 2

 

BECOME AN MvR VIP!

If you like this blog, don’t miss a single post! Join by putting your email in the “Become An MvR VIP” section on this page. It’s either in the upper righthand corner or down below. Members receive discounts on products and services and well as some other cool stuff. Also, please share this blog with anyone you think would benefit from it. I appreciate it when you share it on Twitter, Facebook, and anywhere else. Thanks!

Brent’s Twitter: @Razorbaxter

Brent Baxter Music:  http://www.brentbaxtermusic.com

Brent’s Instagram: Man_vs_Row

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Wordplay Thursday #59

Wordplay Thursday

Welcome to Wordplay Thursday!

Here’s a writing prompt for you.  It’s a simple fill-in-the-blank. You can use one word or several. Feel free to get as crazy, genre-appropriate, or as imaginative as you want. The point is to get the creative juices flowing. And it’s a good thing to dig deeper, so don’t stop at the first idea that hits you. Try coming up with at least five things.

“August was hotter than_____.”

I’ll give you an example to get you started:

“August was hotter than biscuits in a cast iron skillet.”

I’d love to hear what you come up with, so please share in the comments. Oh, and please keep your posts below an R-rating. It’s a family show, after all!

SHOUT OUT!

Thanks to Debbie74, dju316, Michael Flanigan, Barney Coulter, Matt Martoccio, Ken Matthiesen, Jude, Roger Russell, Janet Goodman, Willa Thompson, Julie Durden, Jeff, Writer’s Carnival, Amy Nichols & Dana Russell for your great additions to Wordplay Thursday #58 (read it here)! Great job!

Sept. 17: JOIN MAN VS. ROW IN THE TOP 10!

The listener’s reaction to your song is only as real as the character in your song. This Man vs. Row Top 10 Workshop will focus on W.I.L.L.power.  I’ll teach you tips & techniques to make the characters in your songs come alive and jump out of the radio and into your listeners’ hearts.  To find out more, click on the image below.

MvR Top 10 2

BECOME AN MVR VIP!

If you like this blog and don’t want to miss a single post, or if you want special discounts on Man vs. Row products and services, become an MvR VIP! Simply enter your email in the “Become an MvR VIP” section on this page. It’s either in the upper righthand corner or down below. Also, please share this blog with anyone you think would benefit from it. I appreciate it when you share it on Twitter, Facebook, and anywhere else. Thanks!

Twitter: @Razorbaxter

Facebook: www.brentbaxtermusic.com

Instagram: Man_vs_Row

God Bless,

Brent

Are You Ready To Know Music Row?

Man vs Row

 If you have the dream of breaking into the music business as a songwriter or singer/songwriter, you’ve probably run into the following problems… or you will…

“I can’t get a PRO (ASCAP, SESAC, BMI) representative to help me. Publishers won’t listen to my songs. I can’t get a second meeting with my PRO or a publisher. Publishers will meet with me, but they won’t set me up with cowrites with their writers. What IS a PRO, anyway? And how can they help me?”

You can spend a lot of time guessing the answers or asking other songwriters who are in the same situation as you. The process of trial-and-error is really frustrating- you’re spending time trying to figure out how to get help from your PRO or a publisher when you’d rather be writing songs or doing something else that feels like you’re actually making progress.

PROs and publishers are an on-ramp to the music business highway, but we often find the on-ramp blocked by orange cones!

The day my PRO rep picked up the phone and called a publisher on my behalf was a big day in my career. He used his credibility and personal relationship with that publisher to open a door for me. It was a door I’d been knocking on but couldn’t open by myself. I ended up signing my first publishing deal with that same company, Major Bob Music.

On Monday, September 22, Man vs. Row presents “Know The Row featuring Chad Green.”

Chad spent 11 years as a Nashville Membership Representative for ASCAP (one of the three PROs – Performing Rights Organizations- in the US). He was responsible for signing numerous hit songwriters and publishers. He also oversaw the educational seminars for the Nashville office and created and implemented the successful ASCAP Writers Series workshops.

Chad was also the ASCAP rep who picked up his phone for me that day.

Chad has also spent years as a publisher. Currently, he is the Senior Creative Director for Daywind Music Publishing, where he oversees the day-to-day management of their staff of award-winning writers and producers focusing on multiple genres including Christian, Country, and Film/TV. Green is also responsible for the re-launch of Daywind’s Vital Records. Prior to his time with Daywind, he served as Creative Director for Word Music Publishing, a Warner/Curb company.

Chad is a real-deal publisher and PRO rep who has a heart to teach songwriters about the music business.

In this intimate, one-hour Google Hangout, Chad Green and hit songwriter Brent Baxter (“Monday Morning Church” by Alan Jackson) will discuss topics such as:

*How to get PRO and publisher meetings.
*How to get the most from your PRO.
*What makes a songwriter stand out to a PRO or publisher.
*The dos and don’ts of PRO and publisher meetings.
*and more…

But more than just being a fly on the wall, you’re invited to join in the conversation. Ask YOUR most burning questions to two industry professionals.

There are only a couple spots still open for this exclusive one-hour event, which will be from 8pm to 9pm Central on Monday, September 22, 2014. Find out more and reserve your spot NOW at:

Know The Row pic 2

Become an MvR VIP!

If you like this blog and don’t want to miss a single post, or if you want special discounts on Man vs. Row products and services, become an MvR VIP!  Simply enter your email in the “Become an MvR VIP” section on this page.  It’s either in the upper righthand corner or down below.   Also, please share this blog with anyone you think would benefit from it.  I appreciate it when you share it on Twitter, Facebook, and anywhere else.  Thanks!

Brent’s Twitter: @Razorbaxter

Brent Baxter Music:  http://www.brentbaxtermusic.com

Brent’s Instagram: Man_vs_Row

Single Of The Year: Gord Bamford, “When Your Lips Are So Close”

Gord When Lips Single

Hey, ya’ll!

I just wanted to give you an update on my song, “When Your Lips Are So Close,” cut by Canadian artist, Gord Bamford.  Since it was released as the lead-off single from Gord’s “Country Junkie” album in September 2013, it’s had a great run.  It hit #1 in November of 2013, has been certified as a gold single, and was nominated for two Canadian Country Music (CCMA) Awards for Single Of The Year and Songwriters Of The Year.  While it didn’t win Songwriters Of The Year, it DID win Single Of The Year at last night’s CCMA Awards!  Congrats and thanks to Gord and Byron Hill, our cowriter and the coproducer on the project!

With the win last night, I thought I’d re-post this Cut Study for the song.  Enjoy!

God Bless,

Brent

ORIGINAL POST:

I’m blessed to have written Gord Bamford’s new single, “When Your Lips Are So Close.”  Gord is a hit artist on Sony Canada who is nominated for seven Canadian Country Music Awards.  If all goes according to plan, he’s going to debut our song on the 2013 CCMAs.  Today, I’d like to briefly discuss how I got the song cut and what you can learn from it.

I networked my way to the artist.

I started writing with hit songwriter, Byron Hill, back in 2004.  It wasn’t until later that Byron became Gord’s producer.  Because Byron and I had written several good songs together and he trusted my skill and work ethic, he felt comfortable bringing me into a cowrite with him and Gord.

I asked for the cowrite.

Byron and I are buddies, but he and Gord had a good thing going before bringing me in.  I already knew Byron pretty well, but I still used a patient approach to getting in the room.  It took months, but that’s okay.  You want to be persistent, but you don’t want to push too hard and make your contact uncomfortable.  You don’t want to lose the contact.

I did my research.

When Byron said he’d hook up a cowrite with him and Gord, I got copies of all of Gord’s records.  I listened and wrapped my head around Gord’s brand- what he likes to sing about and his lyrical “voice.”  I also talked to Byron about what works well for Gord.

I did my pre-writing.

I started an idea called “On My Best Days” and tailored it for Gord.  Gord and Byron liked the idea and the sketch I brought in, and we finished it.  It was an album cut on Gord’s album, “Is It Friday Yet?”

I didn’t get lazy.

Even though they cut the only song we’d written, I didn’t assume they’d call me up when Gord was writing for his next record.  Every once in a while, I mentioned to Byron how much I’d love to get back with Gord when he was in town to write.  After several months (and a couple of cancelled trips), we were back on the books.

I did more research and pre-writing.

I didn’t assume that Gord wanted or needed more of the same.  I asked Byron what they wanted for Gord’s next album.  Based on what Byron told me, I spent a few hours on my own looking through my ideas and adapting a few for Gord.  I ran them by Byron, and he liked two of them, “When Your Lips Are So Close” and “Nights Like You.”

I focused on the artist’s needs.

Byron and I originally thought “Nights Like You” would be a midtempo, but Gord liked it as a ballad- he thought it would really connect well with his audience.  Well, he’s the successful artist, and nobody knows his fans like he does, so I’m not going to argue with that.  (He cut that song, as well.)  We also worked to make sure “When Your Lips Are So Close” fit where Gord wanted to go and sat really well in his voice.  Thankfully, it worked out.

So, three cowrites with the artist and producer, and three cuts and one single- I’ll take it!  (I wish all my other artist cowrites worked out this well.)  So, here’s what I learned from this experience:

Use patience and persistence in your networking.  Do your research on the artist.  Pre-write.  Don’t get lazy.  Focus on the artist’s needs.  Of course, there are never any guarantees in the music business, but I believe this process gives you a better chance of success.  Good luck!

THANKS!

Thank you so much, Byron Hill and Gord Bamford, for writing with me and doing such a great job on our songs!  I’m honored to be a small part of your success!

www.gordbamford.com

www.byronhillmusic.com

Sept. 17: JOIN MAN VS. ROW IN THE TOP 10!

The listener’s reaction to your song is only as real as the character in your song. This Man vs. Row Top 10 Workshop will focus on W.I.L.L.power.  I’ll teach you tips & techniques to make the characters in your songs come alive and jump out of the radio and into your listeners’ hearts.  To find out more, click on the image below.

MvR Top 10 2

BECOME AN MVR VIP!

If you like this blog and don’t want to miss a single post, or if you want special discounts on Man vs. Row products and services, become an MvR VIP! Simply enter your email in the “Become an MvR VIP” section on this page. It’s either in the upper righthand corner or down below. Also, please share this blog with anyone you think would benefit from it. I appreciate it when you share it on Twitter, Facebook, and anywhere else. Thanks!

Twitter: @Razorbaxter

Facebook: www.brentbaxtermusic.com

Instagram: Man_vs_Row

God Bless,

Brent

Wordplay Thursday #58

Wordplay Thursday

Welcome to Wordplay Thursday!

Here’s a writing prompt for you.  It’s a simple fill-in-the-blank. You can use one word or several. Feel free to get as crazy, genre-appropriate, or as imaginative as you want. The point is to get the creative juices flowing. And it’s a good thing to dig deeper, so don’t stop at the first idea that hits you. Try coming up with at least five things.

“Dr. Phillips has the bedside manner of _____.”

I’ll give you an example to get you started:

“Dr. Phillips has the bedside manner of a prison guard.”

I’d love to hear what you come up with, so please share in the comments. Oh, and please keep your posts below an R-rating. It’s a family show, after all!

SHOUT OUT!

Thanks to Dionne Kumpe, Janet Goodman, Debbie74, Judith, Ken Matthiesen, Michael & Mikalyn Hay, Cathy, Mae Young, Willa Thompson, Barney Coulter, Julie Darden, Bill Soprano, Jim King, Jerry Childers, Dana Russell, Norma Pfaff, and Matt Martoccio for your great additions to Wordplay Thursday #57 (read it here)! Great job!

Sept. 17: JOIN MAN VS. ROW IN THE TOP 10!

The listener’s reaction to your song is only as real as the character in your song. This Man vs. Row Top 10 Workshop will focus on W.I.L.L.power.  I’ll teach you tips & techniques to make the characters in your songs come alive and jump out of the radio and into your listeners’ hearts.  To find out more, click on the image below.

MvR Top 10 2

BECOME AN MVR VIP!

If you like this blog and don’t want to miss a single post, or if you want special discounts on Man vs. Row products and services, become an MvR VIP! Simply enter your email in the “Become an MvR VIP” section on this page. It’s either in the upper righthand corner or down below. Also, please share this blog with anyone you think would benefit from it. I appreciate it when you share it on Twitter, Facebook, and anywhere else. Thanks!

Twitter: @Razorbaxter

Facebook: www.brentbaxtermusic.com

Instagram: Man_vs_Row

God Bless,

Brent

Are You Ready To Join Man vs. Row In The Top 10?

Man vs Row

The listener’s reaction to your song is only as real as the characters in your song.

Do you have trouble getting your songs to connect with your audience on an emotional level? Do the characters in your songs sometimes feel flat, cliche, or vague? Do you ever wonder how some characters in hit songs seem so real that they leap out of the radio and into your heart while your characters often don’t?

If your goal is success in the music business (as a songwriter writing for cuts, a singer/songwriter working toward a career on radio, or an indie artist wanting better shows and better sales at the merch table), then making your characters REAL is a big deal. If that never happens, odds are your career never happens, either. At least not as big as it should.

Usually when a listener doesn’t connect with the character in a song, it’s because the songwriter hasn’t PROVEN the character to the listener. The listener doesn’t care about your character because the character doesn’t feel real.

The solution to this problem is usually imagery.

When used well, imagery makes your character believable. Pictures are proof. Imagery gets your song past the listener’s head and into the listener’s heart.

TELL me about an cute little abandoned shelter puppy, and I’ll be sad for a minute. SHOW me that cute little abandoned shelter puppy, and I’ll adopt it.

I’m a lyricist. Words are my thing. In a town full of incredible musicians and great singers, I’ve been able to land publishing deals (Major Bob, Peer Music, etc.), cuts (Joe Nichols, Lady Antebellum, Randy Travis, etc.), and hits (Alan Jackson, Gord Bamford) as a lyricist. And a big part of being a successful lyricist is knowing how to use imagery to create believable characters.

On Wednesday, September 17, from 8pm to 9pm Central, I’ll be hosting an exclusive online workshop to teach you how to use imagery to bring your characters to life.

There are only a few “Top Ten” tickets still available for this event, so don’t wait.  Click on the image below to find out more!

MvR Top 10 2

Become an MvR VIP!

If you like this blog and don’t want to miss a single post, or if you want special discounts on Man vs. Row products and services, become an MvR VIP!  Simply enter your email in the “Become an MvR VIP” section on this page.  It’s either in the upper righthand corner or down below.   Also, please share this blog with anyone you think would benefit from it.  I appreciate it when you share it on Twitter, Facebook, and anywhere else.  Thanks!

Brent’s Twitter: @Razorbaxter

Brent Baxter Music:  http://www.brentbaxtermusic.com

Brent’s Instagram: Man_vs_Row

The Story Behind “Monday Morning Church”

Alan Jackson- Monday Morning Church

Brent is a hit songwriter with cuts by Alan Jackson, Randy Travis, Lady Antebellum, Joe Nichols, Gord Bamford, Ray Stevens, and more. He’s written a top 5 hit in the US and a #1 in Canada… so far.

A lot of people ask me about the story behind “Monday Morning Church.” Did I lose someone close to me? Did I just make it up? Stick around and find out.

Back in 1999, I was in the final semester of getting my Master’s Degree in Business at Arkansas State University.

At that point, I was writing songs at night and on weekends.

I went back home to Batesville, Arkansas, one weekend to hang out with the folks. My mom, an English teacher, showed me a poem she had written as an example to her students.

The poem was about a teacher’s day, and it had a line that read, “Trudging wearily through the parking lot, as empty as a Monday-morning church.”

When I saw that line, it about blew the top of my head off! I thought it was a brilliant image. Immediately, I told her I was gonna use it.

Back at school, I started working on the lyric (I don’t write melodies). I remember sitting in my little off-campus apartment at my computer and kicking that title around. With an image like “empty as a Monday morning church,” I knew it had to be something serious.

I settled on the idea of a man who had lost his wife and was having a crisis of faith. The first lines of the song came first:

“You left your Bible on the dresser, so I put it in the drawer. ‘Cuz I can’t seem to talk to God without yelling anymore.”

I remember really liking those lines, even though I knew they might be too in-your-face. As it turns out, they seem to be most peoples’ favorite part of the song, so what do I know?

I’m not sure how long it took me to write the first draft of the lyric- probably a few hours over the next couple of days.

The lyric sat around for a few years…

…with occasional false starts by various cowriters. I eventually moved to Little Rock and met Erin Enderlin, who was a Conway native going to school outside of Nashville.

I rewrote the 2nd verse and showed it to Erin during a cowrite her parents’ place over Christmas break. Thankfully, she liked it. A few days later, she played the melody for me. She’s a great writer.

Erin took our song back to Nashville…

…and played it for her publisher, a guy named Jeff Carlton. He demoed the song I believe in 2003, which was after I had finally made the move to Nashville myself.

Even though I had originally written the lyric with a male artist in mind, Erin sang the demo from a woman’s point of view, and Jeff played it for Keith Stegall, a producer in town. Keith loved it, thank goodness.

In August of 2003, Keith put “Monday Morning Church” on hold for Lee Ann Womack.

It was my first hold.

However, he didn’t end up working on that Lee Ann album, and the song came off hold. Then he put it on hold for Terri Clark. It stayed on hold for her over Christmas.

Word was, she was going into the studio in early March of 2004. On the night of my two-year anniversary of moving to Nashville, Erin called with good news and bad news. The bad news was that Terri didn’t cut our song. The good news was that Alan Jackson had put it on hold.

Well, the rest of that month was pins and needles. Jeff called me with the news that Alan had cut “Monday Morning Church” in late March. It was an unbelievable feeling! Erin and I both finally had our first cuts.

And it only took five years and two states to go from an idea to a record.

God Bless,

Brent

Man vs Row

Sept. 22: KNOW THE ROW with CHAD GREEN

Man vs. Row invites you to be a part of an exclusive Google Hangout with music publisher & former ASCAP Membership Representative, Chad Green. Ask Chad YOUR questions face-to-face as we discus how YOU can get on the radar of a publisher or PRO. To find out more, click on the image below:

Know The Row pic 2

Become an MvR VIP!

If you like this blog and don’t want to miss a single post, or if you want special discounts on Man vs. Row products and services, become an MvR VIP! Simply enter your email in the “Become an MvR VIP” section on this page. It’s either in the upper righthand corner or down below. Also, please share this blog with anyone you think would benefit from it. I appreciate it when you share it on Twitter, Facebook, and anywhere else. Thanks!

Brent’s Twitter: @Razorbaxter

Brent Baxter Music: http://www.brentbaxtermusic.com

Brent’s Instagram: Man_vs_Row

Wordplay Thursday #57

Wordplay Thursday

Welcome to Wordplay Thursday!

Here’s a writing prompt for you.  It’s a simple fill-in-the-blank. You can use one word or several. Feel free to get as crazy, genre-appropriate, or as imaginative as you want. The point is to get the creative juices flowing. And it’s a good thing to dig deeper, so don’t stop at the first idea that hits you. Try coming up with at least five things.

“His coffee was as bitter as _____.”

I’ll give you an example to get you started:

“His coffee was as bitter as an ex-wife.”

I’d love to hear what you come up with, so please share in the comments. Oh, and please keep your posts below an R-rating. It’s a family show, after all!

SHOUT OUT!

Thanks to Matt Martoccio, Debbie74, Janet Goodman, Ken Matthiesen, Paul Alvin Harris, Jim King, Cathy, Mae Young, Ronnie Jones, Amy Nichols, Willa Thompson, Norma Pfaff, Barney Coulter, and Dana Russell for your great additions to Wordplay Thursday #56 (read it here)! Great job!

NEVER MISS ANOTHER MvR POST!

Hey, ya’ll. If you like this blog, then make sure you don’t miss a single post.  I’ll be happy to send each new post directly to your email inbox.  Just let me know where to send it by entering your email address in the “Follow Man vs. Row via E-mail” box either in the top righthand corner or down below.  And I love it when you share this blog through facebook, Twitter, and wherever! Thanks!

Twitter: @Razorbaxter

Facebook: www.brentbaxtermusic.com

Instagram: Man_vs_Row

God Bless,

Brent

The Songwriter Who Cried “Hit!”

Man vs Row

Brent is a hit songwriter with cuts by Alan Jackson, Randy Travis, Lady Antebellum, Joe Nichols, Gord Bamford, Ray Stevens, and more.  He’s written a top 5 hit in the US and a #1 in Canada… so far.

Please protect the authority of your word.

Make your word mean something. If people can’t trust your word, they’ll keep you at a distance.  Don’t be like the songwriter who cried “hit.” Don’t overhype accomplishments which are not… accomplished yet. Protect the value of your word, or people will stop investing in you and your career.

I know a person who always has some deal that’s huge and a “done deal.” Some deal that’s going to make us both a lot of money, etc. But not one of these deals (record deals, cuts, hit singles, etc.) have actually happened. And it’s not just big things- small things like “demoing our song tomorrow” rarely materialize. As a result, I just don’t get excited about any “big news.” I don’t know if this person is just trying to speak their wishes into existence or if they’re just naive… but either way, I just don’t believe this person anymore.

No, I don’t share this to complain.

I’m sharing this to beg you NOT to be this person.

This person is nice and has potential, but I can’t and won’t recommend that any of my contacts work with them. I simply don’t trust this person enough. I don’t want this person either looking like a fool or a fraud to my contacts. It hurts my credibility if I vouch for them. I just can’t afford that.

It’s true that if enough people THINK you’re a hot property, then you ARE a hot property in Nashville. But you can’t be dishonest. The wheels turn slowly here, and people have plenty of time to jump back off your bandwagon when they realize they can’t believe anything you say. It’s fine to promote yourself and highlight your accomplishments, but be honest with people.

Please, protect the value of your word.

What do you think?  Have you had dealings with people like this?  What was the result?  Do you still work with them?  I’d love to hear from you!

God Bless,

Brent

THE PRO KNOWS

To BE a pro, you need to THINK like a pro. In this complimentary report, learn the mindsets that help the pro songwriter get cuts, earn respect in the industry, and maintain long-term success in the music business. Just click on the picture below to download this complimentary report today!
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FOLLOW AND SHARE THIS BLOG

If you like this blog, don’t miss a single post!  Subscribe by putting your email in the “Follow Man vs. Row via E-mail” section on this page.  It’s either in the upper righthand corner or down below.   Also, please share this blog with anyone you think would benefit from it.  I appreciate it when you share it on Twitter, Facebook, and anywhere else.  Thanks!

Brent’s Twitter: @Razorbaxter

Brent Baxter Music:  http://www.brentbaxtermusic.com

Brent’s Instagram: Man_vs_Row

Wordplay Thursday #56

Wordplay Thursday

Welcome to Wordplay Thursday!

Here’s a writing prompt for you.  It’s a simple fill-in-the-blank. You can use one word or several. Feel free to get as crazy, genre-appropriate, or as imaginative as you want. The point is to get the creative juices flowing. And it’s a good thing to dig deeper, so don’t stop at the first idea that hits you. Try coming up with at least five things.

“He was angrier than _____.”

I’ll give you an example to get you started:

“He was angrier than a cheating husband’s father-in-law.”

I’d love to hear what you come up with, so please share in the comments. Oh, and please keep your posts below an R-rating. It’s a family show, after all!

SHOUT OUT!

Thanks to Debbie74, Barney Coulter, Janet Goodman, johnshouse, martinvipond, Amy Nichols, Debbie Convoy, Ken Matthiesen, t, Mikael Mbenga, David Michael, Dean Stacey, Bill Soprano, Laurie, Willa Thompson, Selwyn, Matt Martoccio, and Dana Russell for your great additions to Wordplay Thursday #55 (read it here)! Great job!

NEVER MISS ANOTHER MvR POST!

Hey, ya’ll. If you like this blog, then make sure you don’t miss a single post.  I’ll be happy to send each new post directly to your email inbox.  Just let me know where to send it by entering your email address in the “Follow Man vs. Row via E-mail” box either in the top righthand corner or down below.  And I love it when you share this blog through facebook, Twitter, and wherever! Thanks!

Twitter: @Razorbaxter

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God Bless,

Brent

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